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Lottery Syndicate FAQs

Whether you are interested in joining an online syndicate or are thinking of setting up your own group offline, there are a few things you might want to know first. Take a look at some frequently asked questions about lottery syndicates to find out more.

1. What is a lottery syndicate?

A lottery syndicate consists of a group of players who have come together to buy tickets for a game. The price of tickets is shared between all the members of the syndicate and any money won is shared between the participants. By owning a share of multiple tickets, players are increasing their chances of winning without having to worry about the costs of purchasing more entries.

Players can join online syndicates or create offline groups of their own and take part in exciting games like Lotto, EuroMillions or Thunderball.

2. Is a syndicate agreement needed?

If you are starting your own syndicate offline, it is important to have a syndicate agreement in place even if you are playing with trusted friends or colleagues. A formal document lets everyone know what numbers will be played, which draws your group will enter and when you have to pay for your portion of the entries.

National Lottery rules dictate that a prize can only be paid to one person, so having a syndicate manager and a syndicate agreement in place can help to prevent possible tax implications for everyone. Take a look at a sample syndicate agreement for the sort of ideas that could be included.

3. What does a syndicate manager have to do?

It is always a good idea to appoint a trustworthy and responsible person as syndicate manager, as they will be in charge of purchasing tickets and keeping them safe, making sure that every group member has paid on time and sharing out any winnings once they have been collected. Playing online can help with the security and checking of tickets, while it is worth a second member of the syndicate being assigned the job of making sure nothing is missed (e.g. double-checking tickets).

4. Are there any limits on the number of people allowed in a syndicate?

You can have as many people as you like in a syndicate if you are creating your own offline group, as buying more tickets will give you a greater chance of winning a prize. However, bear in mind that particularly large syndicates may be harder to manage, and the winnings will also have to be divided between more players.

Online syndicates work differently as there will be a set number of shares available for the syndicate, perhaps 35, 50 or 55, and you can buy as many as you like. You can just buy one share to guarantee you get a percentage of any winnings, or purchase more to get a bigger cut of any prize money won.

5. How are syndicate tickets bought?

Tickets can be bought online or from any authorised retailer in the UK. When entering an online syndicate, the tickets have already been bought on your behalf and you just need to decide how many shares you wish to purchase.

6. How are syndicate prizes paid?

National Lottery prizes can only be claimed by one person, so the syndicate manager will receive any winnings in the same way as any individual playing the game on their own. It is then their responsibility to share the money amongst the rest of the group. This is where a signed syndicate agreement can be extremely useful!

Prizes won by online syndicates will automatically be paid out to each member of the group, making the whole process quick and simple. There is no need to contact anyone to make a claim or work out how much each player is owed.

7. Does our syndicate have to be declared?

It is a good idea to have a syndicate agreement in place, signed by all the participants, which means that members will not have to pay tax on their winnings. Prizes can only be paid to one person, so the syndicate manager will have to be registered as a player if buying tickets online. A syndicate agreement can also provide details of how the group will decide whether to go public or stay anonymous in the event of a big win.

8. How do I join an online syndicate?

Entering an online syndicate is a quick, convenient and secure way to boost your chances of winning a prize. All you have to do is decide whether you wish to play Lotto, EuroMillions or Thunderball, and buy as many shares as you wish.

9. How do I know the tickets have been bought?

When entering an online syndicate, you are buying shares in tickets which have been bought on your behalf. These tickets are scanned and copies are uploaded to your account to show they have been purchased, and any prizes won will be paid out automatically.

For offline syndicates, it is up to the groupís manager to collect payment from each member and then buy the tickets, before checking results and distributing any winnings. Playing online removes any stress from process and lets you just enjoy the fun of taking part as a group!

10. How are prizes for online syndicates divided?

Online syndicate prizes are divided into equal shares, and the amount each player receives depends on the amount of shares they have purchased. For example, if a syndicate had 50 shares and won a jackpot of £50 million, each share would be worth £1 million. If you purchased one share, you would receive £1 million, while if you purchased two shares, you would receive £2 million, and so on.

11. Are lottery syndicates legal?

Yes. Syndicates are legal and make it easy to have fun whilst increasing your chances of winning a lottery prize. Just make sure if you are setting up your own account to have a syndicate agreement in place to avoid disputes. If you are playing online, the syndicate will be run for you by a lottery concierge service, which safely and legally buys your tickets and pays any winnings, thereby acting as the syndicate manager.