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EuroMillions Prizes and Odds

You win EuroMillions prizes by matching your selected numbers to those drawn in the winning line. Match just a couple of main numbers to receive an award, or predict the full set correctly to land a jackpot worth up to €200 million. Discover more about all the EuroMillions odds and payouts.

EuroMillions Payouts

There are 13 different EuroMillions prizes on offer in every draw. However, the amount you win in each tier is not a fixed amount. Instead, a percentage of the total prize fund is allocated to each category and that is split between winners. This is known as a pari-mutuel method and leads to variation in the prize amounts, because the number of tickets sold and the number of winners is always different.

The following table shows all the different ways to win prizes, along with the odds of winning. You can see how much of the prize fund is allocated to each tier and the average payout you can expect if you match those numbers.

Match % Prize Fund Odds of Winning Average Prize Amount Per Draw
5 + 2 Lucky Stars 50% 1 in 139,838,160 €52,432,910.77
5 + 1 Lucky Star 2.61% 1 in 6,991,908 €442,535.52
5 0.61% 1 in 3,107,514.67 €71,511.27
4 + 2 Lucky Stars 0.19% 1 in 621,502.93 €4,016.62
4 + 1 Lucky Star 0.35% 1 in 31,075.15 €190.13
3 + 2 Lucky Stars 0.37% 1 in 14,125.07 €79.60
4 0.26% 1 in 13,811.18 €83.55
2 + 2 Lucky Stars 1.30% 1 in 985.47 €19.49
3 + 1 Lucky Star 1.45% 1 in 706.25 €14.36
3 2.70% 1 in 313.89 €11.96
1 + 2 Lucky Stars 3.27% 1 in 187.71 €10.35
2 + 1 Lucky Star 10.30% 1 in 49.27 €7.85
2 16.59% 1 in 21.9 €4.16
The overall odds of winning a EuroMillions prize are 1 in 13

Figures calculated using results drawn between 10/05/2011 and 01/12/2020.

The jackpot starts at €17 million and if there are no winners the full amount rolls over to the following draw. It can keep rolling over all the way to its maximum of €200 million; visit the Jackpot Cap page to find out what happens when the jackpot reaches this amount.

Apart from the jackpot, the funds allocated to a prize tier are added to the category below if there are no winners in any of the participating countries.

Due to the pari-mutuel nature of calculating prizes, it is possible that the EuroMillions payout for one of the lower tiers might actually be larger in value than the payout for a higher prize tier. All prizes are rounded down to the nearest 10p.

How EuroMillions Prizes Are Funded

The base currency of EuroMillions is the Euro, but calculating prizes in sterling isn’t always as simple as converting amounts directly from Euros to pounds. The following steps demonstrate how EuroMillions prizes are funded and why there is sometimes a difference in the prizes paid out to UK players and those from other countries. You can find a more detailed explanation of the process following this guide.

  • Every participating EuroMillions country pays €1.10 from every ticket sold into the Common Prize Fund.
  • The National Lottery’s contribution to the Common Prize Fund is £0.87 from every ticket, which is converted to Euros on the date of the relevant draw.
  • After the draw, the money in the Common Prize Fund is used to pay out winners in all countries and is split according to the percentages in the prize table.
  • But wait! According to current exchange rates £0.87 is worth less than €1.10, so the UK has paid less into the Common Prize Fund than other countries have.
  • To balance this, the shortfall is deducted from the funds available to pay UK players. The funds left available to pay prizes are still split according to the percentages in the prize table.
  • The jackpot is exempt from these rules, so players in all participating countries win the same amount in Euros.

If in the future it comes to be that Camelot’s contribution to the Common Prize Fund amounts to more than the contribution from other countries, UK players will receive bigger payouts than players in those other countries.

When converting the funds back to sterling, the same exchange rate is used as was used when the National Lottery contributed funds to the Common Prize Fund.

Camelot Prize Fund

EuroMillions prizes are funded by the revenue from ticket sales. The price of a £2.50 ticket is split into £1.74 for entry into EuroMillions and £0.76 for entry to the UK Millionaire Maker raffle. As the two games cannot be entered separately to each other, the price of a ticket is always advertised as £2.50.

Fifty percent of the £1.74 that goes on EuroMillions is used to fund prizes, creating what the National Lottery refers to as the ‘Camelot Prize Fund.’ The other 50 percent of the ticket revenue is used to fund good causes and to pay various operating costs and commissions.

This prize fund is used to pay out EuroMillions prizes and is split between each prize tier according to the percentages shown in the prize table on this page. The remaining 10 percent goes to the EuroMillions Reserve Fund, which is in place to ensure that the minimum top prize of €17 million can always be offered. It is also used to pay for other special promotional events such as Superdraws.

Some of the percentages change after the first five draws in a rollover series. At that point the amount allocated to the jackpot goes from 50 percent to 42 percent and the contribution to the Reserve Fund increases from 10 percent to 18 percent. A rollover series starts from the first draw after the EuroMillions jackpot has been won.

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The Camelot Prize Fund and the Common Prize Fund are two different things. The former is the amount of money that has accumulated from UK ticket sales to pay out prizes, while the latter is the money that has accumulated from ticket sales in all countries, including the UK. The Camelot Prize Fund is paid into the Common Prize Fund.

Common Prize Fund

Every country that participates in EuroMillions contributes €1.10 from every ticket sold into what’s known as the ‘Common Prize Fund.’ The National Lottery’s contribution to this shared fund is the money that has accrued in the Camelot Prize Fund.

The money that has been paid into the Common Prize Fund is then used to pay out all prizes in all participating countries. The amount of money required to pay out prizes is paid back to the EuroMillions provider in each country. For UK prizes, the money is converted back to sterling using the same exchange rate that was used when the National Lottery paid into the Common Prize Fund.

Why UK prizes are different to the payouts in other countries

The difference in the value of sterling and Euros has an effect on how much prize money is paid out to UK players. At present the National Lottery’s contribution to the Common Prize Fund is £0.87 (50 percent of £1.84) from every ticket sold, which when exchanged to Euros is less than the €1.10 that other countries pay into the fund.

This difference is accounted for when the prize money is paid back to the National Lottery from the Common Prize Fund. The value of the shortfall is deducted from the amount of money the UK has to pay out prizes. The result is that UK winners receive proportionately less than winners from other countries.

For example, if the UK sells five million tickets for a particular draw, the National Lottery’s contribution to the Common Prize Fund would work out at £4.35 million. If the exchange rate on the day of the draw determines that £1 equals €1.10, this contribution would be worth around €4.8 million.

France pays €1.10 into the Common Prize Fund, so if five million tickets are also sold there for the same draw, the country would contribute €5.5 million into the Common Prize Fund, around €700,000 more than the UK paid in.

To balance this out and ensure players in all countries are paid fairly, the amount of money available to pay UK players would be reduced by €700,000 – the same amount as the shortfall in the contribution from the National Lottery.*

This goes both ways, so if the exchange rate between pounds and Euros ever changes to the point where the UK’s contribution to the Common Prize Fund amounts to more than that of other countries, UK players would receive bigger payouts than players in those countries.

* Please note that the figures provided here are for illustrative purposes only and are not based on actual sales figures from the UK National Lottery or any other EuroMillions partner.